Genetic Differences Contributing to TMD Susceptibility in Males

Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the leading cause of chronic orofacial pain. They represent a type of "idiopathic" pain disorder, meaning that the cause or causes are unknown, but research over the decade suggests a genetic component contributing to susceptibility. There is also a well-known gender difference in frequency of TMD, with more women affected than men, especially in more severe and chronic cases. Further, evidence is accumulating that there are sex differences in the way men and women perceive and respond to pain.

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David CoreComment
TMJ Vs. Ernest Syndrome

 Ernest Syndrome, one of several orofacial disorders, is often mistaken for temporomandibular disorder (TMD), which is itself a type of orofacial dysfunction that comprises a number of symptoms involving the TM joints, the muscles of mastication and related structures and is often accompanied by TM joint noises, restrictions in opening, lateral jaw deflection to the affected side and impaired functional ability.

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David CoreComment
Yawning and TMD

People who have a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) are constantly thinking about actions that may seem insignificant to others. The simplest of gestures could harm the jaw of a person with TMD, leaving them feeling sore and miserable. Chewing a piece of gum, talking for long periods of time, or yawning can potentially be the cause of concern when your TMJ is already sore and inflamed.

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David CoreComment
TMD and Migraines

TMD often coexists with daily or near-daily headache syndromes but is overlooked by many physicians in the history and physical examination.

Headaches typically begin as episodic disorders but certain causative factors influence the progression from episodic to daily or near-daily head-ache disorders. Over the last five years, multiple epidemiological studies have identified common risk factors for transformation of episodic to chronic migraine. The most common risk factors include: obesity, socioeconomic status, medication overuse, and previous head trauma.

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David CoreComment
TMJ Repositioning

Using a hydrostatic oral appliance can help treat head, face, and neck pain.

Occlusal splints are removable interocclusal appliances that are usually fabricated out of hard acrylic. The objectives of splint use in the treatment of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and myofascial pain dysfunction (MPD) include: eliminating occlusal interferences, stabilizing tooth and joint relationships, passive stretching of the musculature to reduce abnormal muscle activity, decreasing parafunctional habits, protecting against tooth abrasion and decreasing joint loading. Splints also function diagnostically as an indirect method of altering occlusion.

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David CoreComment
TMJ vs. Trigeminal Neuralgia

Both TMJ and trigeminal neuralgia can lead to significant face or jaw pain. Both conditions share similar symptoms, but there are a few symptoms that will indicate if a person has one condition or the other.

TMJ disorder:

  • Jaw Pain…

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David Core
Know The Temporo-Mandibular Joint

The temporomandibular joint is a ball-and-socket joint comprised of three parts:

The ball, also known as the condyle

  • The socket, also known as the glenoid fossa

  • A small disc that sits in between the two…

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David Core
What Does TMJ Feel Like?

TMJ has become a very common problem, affecting between 5% and 12% of all Americans.

Its symptoms include:

  • Headache

  • Jaw Pain

  • Ear pain

  • Popping, clicking when opening or closing jaw

  • Being poorly rested

  • Bruxism…

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David Core
Early Treatment of TMJ May Prevent Health Issues

If you or someone you know is suffering from TMJ, do not hesitate to seek treatment immediately.

Early intervention to TMJ can reduce pain and treatment costs.

In 2011, researchers determined

“…as the duration of pain increases, patients become more unresponsive to intervention...

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David Core